That Easy Road

“I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.”– Thomas Jefferson

The greatest lesson Mom ever taught me, though, was this one: she told me there would be times in your life when you have to choose between being loved and being respected. She said to always pick being respected, that love without respect was always fleeting -- but that respect could grow into real, lasting love.

Now, of course, she was talking about women.

But I have learned over time that it applies just as much to leadership. In fact, I think that advice applies to America today more than ever.

I believe we have become paralyzed by our desire to be loved.

Our founding fathers had the wisdom to know that social acceptance and popularity is fleeting and that this country’s principles needed to be rooted in strengths greater than the passions and emotions of the times.

Our leaders today have decided it is more important to be popular, to do what is easy and say “yes,” rather than to say no when “no” is what’s required.

In recent years, we as a country have too often chosen the same path.

It’s been easy for our leaders to say not us, and not now, in taking on the tough issues. And we’ve stood silently by and let them get away with it.

But tonight, I say enough.

I say, together, let’s make a much different choice. Tonight, we are speaking up for ourselves and stepping up.

We are beginning to do what is right and what is necessary to make our country great again.

We are demanding that our leaders stop tearing each other down, and work together to take action on the big things facing America.

Tonight, we choose respect over love.

We are not afraid. We are taking our country back. -Gov Chris Christie.

As I have said many a times, the Truth doesn’t care if you like it. It’s still the truth.

10 years ago I was facing a mountain of debt that I had no hope of fixing. Then I looked at myself and my situation very honestly.

I didn’t like what I saw. But unlike today, I didn’t blame others and then just keep doing it because it was there fault. I didn’t take the easy road.

Sure my ex-roommate had a lot to do with my nearly bankruptcy, but I also was responsible for helping him do it!

I decided that “It is what it is” and I don’t have to like it. But I do have to do something about it.

My parents come from the Depression as young kids and World War II as young adults. They came from an industrious, hard working, background.

I was rediscovering my roots.

I worked 2 jobs from 7:30am to 1am 5 days a week for years. My parents also saw that I had finally risen to the challenge but didn’t help me until years down that road.

I remade my life. From near bankruptcy (I had $125 in the bank and a rent payment for more than that in 2 weeks) nearly every week for 3 years to owning a home with a job with a 401K and a pension plan.

Now that was hard work. And it’s FAR from over. Far from over. But, I used to joke that it would have benefited me if I could have had a microwave in the passenger seat of my car because then I could eat commuting between jobs and get a longer nap (which was an hour). I settled for fast food and microwave dinners. Not the healthiest choice. But it was what it was.

But now I have an obsessive work ethic that drives my boss crazy.

I made the choice.

My ex-roommate is probably still living with his mother wondering why the universe doesn’t bow down and kiss his lazy ass brilliance.

That’s the difference.

And I see that today also.

And I applaud any politician who will stand up and not only tell you the truth about the shit we’re in, but actually wants to do something about it.

Mind you all the “roommates” want to complain to you about how mean you are.

Tough Crap. Tough Love. Tough Times.

My parents survived them so can we. But the spoiled brats have to grow up.

The Truth is what it is. You don’t have to like it.

16 Trillion in Debt isn’t going to go away if you just talk to it nicely and try to reason and appease it.

8%+ unemployment for nearly 4 years is going to go away if you keep savaging the people you want to hire them and sabotaging the workers who want to work rather than just sit on their buns watching Ellen all day.

Medical Costs must be controlled, but Obamacare is not the solution. It’s throwing napalm on the fire.

Inflation will not go away.

And most importantly, not everything in the universe is all about you! You are NOT the center of the universe and everyone must kiss your royal ass.

Get over it.

Then go out and do something extraordinary, not sit around blaming others.

Life ISN’T Fair. Never will be. Deal with it!

And anyone who says they can make it “fair” is a DAMNED LIAR!

“A government big enough to supply you with everything you need, is a government big enough to take away everything that you have….”–Thomas Jefferson

“My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.”–Thomas Jefferson

NOVEMBER IS COMING!

SEE TRUTH I DARE YOU

Michael Ramirez Cartoon

Political Cartoons by Bob Gorrell

The Future of ObamaCare?

The Nationalized Health Care of Canada has stuck again.

This is ongoing and started earlier this week but Wisconsin took up the time.

If this doesn’t outrage you, you must be dead, or a Liberal.

But it’s coming to an ObamaCare near you…

London, Ontario Free Press: Jane Sims The London Free Press Moe Maraachli keeps the snapshots of his dying baby boy in an envelope in his jacket pocket.

He pulls out the photos of the son he’s about to lose, trying to  understand how a hospital, an Ontario health-related board assigned to  judge consent issues, and a London court could say he and his wife can’t  take Baby Joseph home to Windsor to die.

“I do my best for my baby. I do my best,” he said Thursday outside the London courthouse, tears in his eyes.

“This is killing, this is criminal . . . I’m sure this is murder.”

This Monday, on Family Day in Ontario, Joseph Maraachli, who’s in a  vegetative state from a neurodegenerative disease, will die after his  breathing tube is removed from his tiny body at a London hospital,  ending an ethical and legal dilemma that tried to balance unwanted  suffering with the needs of a child and his family.

“I lose my baby,” his father, 37, who came to Canada from Lebanon 11 years ago, said. “They take him from me.”

“I don’t lose my baby like God take him. They take him. They want to take him.”

“It was basically our family’s word versus the medical system’s  world,” said his aunt, Samar Nader, who’s sure she saw Joseph respond to  her this week when she touched his head.

“I think in medicine, they’re just looking at the world from a black and white point of view.”

“The family understands the child and for us to witness his death on Monday . . . I don’t know,” she said.

An emotional Superior Court Justice Helen Rady, who called it  “heartbreaking” and “such a sad and difficult case”, decided Thursday  not to allow the family’s appeal of a decision last month by Ontario’s  Consent and Capacity Board to have the child’s breathing tube removed  and put in place a do-not-resuscitate order and palliative care.

The baby’s father and mother, Sana Nader, 35, wanted the same  treatment for Joseph as was given to their daughter before she died,  eight years ago at 18 months – give Joseph a tracheotomy and  ventilation, and allow them to take him home to die what they would be a  peaceful death.

But Joseph’s doctors say while a tracheotomy – an incision is made in  a patient’s airway, to help breathing – may prolong the baby’s life,  it’s futile in this case and would likely cause much discomfort. It  would certainly also increase the risk of infection and pneumonia, they  argue.

“The medical officials would not want this little boy to suffer,” Rady said.

When born in January 2010, Joseph, now 13 months, was a beautiful, normal baby.

But five months later he started having seizures like his sister. By June, he couldn’t swallow.

In October, he stopped breathing while travelling with his parents.  He was taken to an Ingersoll hospital, then rushed to the London Health  Sciences Centre’s pediatric critical care unit where he’s been ever  since.

His father has stayed in London to be with his son.

His mother is in London every weekend and returns to Windsor to look after the couple’s other son, Ali.

Joseph’s on a ventilator and fed through a tube. He’s in what the  doctors call “a persistent vegetative state.” The doctors say he’s blind  and deaf.

He’s missing all five brain stem reflexes considered necessary for  life – gag, cough, eye movement, pupil and cornea responses. His brain  deterioration is irreversible.

A team of doctors, including a world-renowned pediatric expert from  Toronto’s Hospital for Sick Children, has examined Joseph and agrees  he’s dying of the same progressive neurodegenerative disease that  claimed his sister.

Joseph’s doctor told the adjudication board that doctors  “reluctantly” gave the couple’s daughter a tracheotomy. Since then,  doctors have learned “substantially” more about the procedure and  determined it isn’t right for Joseph.

The board agreed with Joseph’s attending doctor that the baby has “no hope or chance of ever recovering.”

“While we feel a great deal of empathy for the parents, we held that  their view was not in any way realistic,” the board said, adding  Joseph’s parents “were blinded by their obvious love” for their child.

The State Board knows better!!!  Sound ObamaCare-ish? Yes!

Obamacare establishes the Independent Payment Advisory Board, whose stated responsibility is to develop proposals to reduce the growth of Medicare spending.
His parents fear Joseph will choke to death once the tube is removed.  They say he responds to their touch and wanted the board to see him in  hospital before deciding.

Rady said it’s unclear what the board would have seen had its members  agreed. And she noted that while Joseph’s head and body have grown, it  doesn’t mean the medical assessments are wrong.

The case digs deeply into the delicate balance of life versus. suffering.

Ethicist Margaret Somerville, of McGill University’s Centre for  Medicine, Ethics and Law, said the case is “a judgment where the parents  are giving priority to the prolongation of life and the doctor is  giving priority to the quality of that life.”

“I’m sure there’s no doubt in this case that this child has a very  poor quality of life, but we do know that health care professionals  judge quality of life much lower than people themselves do.”

Somerville said such quality-of-life decisions are delicate and often  at odds. What needs to be examined is why the family doesn’t agree with  the decision and if their reasons are acceptable, she said.

The board had ordered Joseph’s breathing tube be removed Friday, but Rady said that wasn’t sensitive to the family’s need.

Instead, she ordered they comply by Monday – a statutory holiday in  Ontario, to celebrate family – “to afford the whole family adequate time  to say their good-byes.”

Rady’s voice broke when she addressed the family. “I hope that in time you’ll find peace,” she said.

Joseph’s father wasn’t satisfied. “It’s not help,” he said later.

His lawyer, Geoff Snow, said he understands Rady’s decision but  added, “the loss of a child in any circumstances is tragic and it’s  unfortunate that there’s not more than could have been done.”

Lawyer Julie Zamprogna Balles, who acted for the doctor, said Rady’s decision was “well-reasoned and compassionate.”

While the case had “very sad and unfortunate circumstances,” everyone  involved, she said, have “focused on Little Joseph’s best interests.”

But a grieving Moe Maraachli said there’s “no humanity” in Canada. He expressed a desire to die himself.

“I stay with him until the last moments and hopefully I go with him,” he said.

THE ETHICAL ISSUE

Whether to provide medical intervention to prolong the life of a dying child who’s in a persistent vegetative state.

THE LEGAL ISSUE

Whether to allow an appeal of a decision by an Ontario health-based  board that adjudicates consent issues, to take the child off life  support.

****

LONDON, Ont. – A father who has been battling to stop a London, Ont.,  hospital from removing his terminally ill son from a ventilator stood  his ground Monday and defied a court order requiring him to give  consent.

Moe Maraachli says he and his wife Sana Nader are happy  the breathing tube keeping their 13-month old son Joseph alive has not  yet been removed.

But their fight to get the boy a tracheotomy so they can take him home to die isn’t over.

“I’m  very excited because my son doesn’t remove his tube today,” said  Maraachli, who has been sleeping at the hospital since Friday.

“All my family is happy. We are happy. We feel it’s really Family Day today.”

The Windsor, Ont., couple has been fighting for months against doctors at Victoria Hospital in London  who say their son should be removed from life support because he will  not recover from the rare neurological condition that has left him in a  vegetative state.

The family fears Joseph will suffer a painful  death if the ventilator is removed, and prefers that a tracheotomy be  performed so they can take him home to live his remaining days  surrounded by people who love him.

The couple’s 18-month-old  daughter died almost nine years ago from a similar medical condition.  She had a tracheotomy and lived at home for six months before she died,  said Maraachli.

But, last Thursday, Ontario Superior Court Justice Helen Rady ordered the couple to agree to take Joseph off the ventilator by 10 a.m. Monday.

The judge was upholding a decision already made by Ontario’s Consent and Capacity Board.

Because  the London hospital could not get consent to remove the breathing tube  from Joseph’s parents or other family members, it has the right to seek  consent from the Office of the Public Guardian and Trustee, said Mark  Handelman, Maraachli’s lawyer.

But Maraachli is hoping his son Joseph will be transferred to Michigan’s Children’s Hospital in Detroit.

Joseph  has been treated there before under the Ontario Provincial Health  Insurance Plan and the family feels they would have another chance at  persuading doctors to perform a tracheotomy if he returns there.

The couple’s friends recently contacted the U.S. hospital about a transfer and the London Health Sciences Centre, which Victoria Hospital falls under, was asked to send Joseph’s medical records there on Sunday.

The London hospital sent Joseph’s medical chart by courier to Detroit on Monday, said spokeswoman Laurie Gould.

“At this point in time we have not received any request for transfer,” said Gould.

If a transfer request is made, Gould said her hospital would contact the public guardian and “wait for their direction.”

The London hospital would not need permission from the public guardian to transfer Joseph to Michigan, said Handelman.

Alex Schadenberg, executive director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, called the baby Joseph case sad and tragic.

Schadenberg questioned why doctors, not parents, should have the final say over their baby’s care.

“Is it right that the doctor has now so much power?” asked Schadenberg.

“I think the balance of power has shifted in Ontario too far, and I’m getting very concerned about who has the right to decide.”

Gould said the case is certainly “emotionally charged.”

The  hospital has received calls and emails from the public, some offering  prayers for the baby, who’s been at the hospital since October, she  said.

As cars honked their horns, a couple of dozen people holding  signs and photos of the baby held a vigil outside the hospital Monday  morning, an hour before the baby was to be removed from the ventilator.

Maraachli’s  sister-in-law Samar Nader said the family is “relieved and thankful”  for all the support they’ve received from the public.

“It’s true  that miracles do happen and I would never have expected for my nephew to  live past 10 o’clock without the people’s help,” she said.

****

(CNN) — A Canadian family fighting to keep their 13-month-old son on a breathing tube says they have been denied a request to have him transferred to a hospital in Michigan.

Moe and Sana Maraachli refused to sign consent when Canadian health officials determined their son Joseph, who suffers from a progressive degenerative neurological disease and was in a persistent vegetative state, should be removed from life support. Joseph is being treated at the London Health Sciences Centre in Ontario.

The Maraachlis reached out to the Children’s Hospital of Michigan in Detroit in hopes of having their son transferred there for continued care.

Family spokesperson Sam Sansalone said the hospital initially agreed to accept the transfer. He said he has since received an email indicating the request has been denied.

Sansalone forwarded an email from the Detroit hospital that he said explains that after a review of Joseph’s records by neurological and intensive care physicians, “we cannot offer Joseph anything that he has not been provided already during his current admission by his current clinical care team … transfer to our facility will not provide him or the family any benefit.”

Vickie Winn, a spokesperson from the Children’s Hospital, confirmed Joseph is not a patient at the hospital but could not offer further comment, citing patient privacy laws.

Sansalone said the family is pursuing at least three other hospitals in other states.

The family says the hospital has it wrong and that their son is not in a persistent vegetative state. Sansalone said they have noted experiences where the baby has responded to being tickled and has jolted when he felt discomfort with examinations or the feeding tubes. They say these are signs he might still have brain function.

However, Canadian health officials disagree. On February 17, they decided Joseph should be removed from life support. The family was given until February 21 to say their goodbyes and sign the consent, but they have yet to do so.

The Maraachlis are seeking a second opinion from what they consider to be an objective source that can review the more than 1,000 pages of Joseph’s medical records and provide a better assessment of their son’s treatment options.

If he is beyond hope, they want him to be able to receive a tracheotomy, where he can be transferred home and die in the care of family instead of in a hospital.

Experts say even if the family is granted this request, caring for a child in this condition is an arduous task.

Dr. David Casarett, director of research and evaluation at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wissahickon Hospice, says patients at home with tracheotomies need monitoring to make sure the airway is clear of secretions, the skin is clean and dry and someone can make sure the incision at the tracheotomy site does not get infected.

“A child’s care would be much more complex if a home ventilator is required, since the parents would need to manage the ventilator with the help of a nurse and respiratory therapist,” he said.

Suzanne Vitadamo, spokesperson for the Terri Schiavo Life & Hope Network and Terri’s sister, issued the following statement:

“It is unacceptable for Canadian Health Allocation Officials and/or the Canadian Government to make decisions for Joseph that will end his life and deny the wishes of his loving parents.

“Every patient, regardless of age, has a right to proper and dignified health care. It is frightening to once again see government usurp the God-given rights of parents to love and care for their child at home, especially when the child is dying.”

We are from the Government and we are here to help you, control you, and make decisions for you.

Rejoice!

Political Cartoons by Chuck Asay

Political Cartoons by Gary McCoy