2016

Something I’ve already said:

“All of a sudden this man gets up and says, ‘How long will you blame the previous administration for all of your problems?'” former Clinton Secretary of State Madeleine Albright recounted. “I said, ‘Forever.'”

The story prompted laughter and applause from the crowd.

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  • Obama America

2016themovie.com

D’Souza: The movie is divided into two parts. One looks backward into Obama’s past and the other looks forward into what we can expect over the next four years. There’s roughly equal time in the movie to both themes. The movie is also based on two books – my earlier book, The Roots of Obama’s Rage (2010), and a new book I have coming out next month called Obama’s America. The earlier book looks back and the new book looks forward, and the movie combines both.

D’Souza: One of the themes in the movie is the anti-colonial goal of downsizing America in the name of global justice. So, the core idea here is that America has become a rogue nation in the world and also that America enjoys a standard of living that is unconscionably high compared to the rest of the world. So, anti-colonialism is a program of global reparations, not racial reparations. It’s reparations for global injustice. Obama’s goal is to shrink America. He wants to reduce America’s footprint in the world because he thinks we are stepping on the world. He wants to redistribute money away from the rich and toward the poor. But we are not talking about the rich and the poor in America solely. We are talking about a redistribution of income away from the rich countries – America included – toward the poor countries such as Mexico, Brazil, Columbia, and so on. This is where I think we misunderstand Obama when he talks about the 99 percent. We think he means the 99 percent only in America. He doesn’t. He actually means worldwide. It’s important to realize that the middle class or even poor Americans are rich by global standards.
Well, the film is intended to [offer] a debate about what’s the future of America. Nowhere in the film do we mention the election. We certainly don’t tell people how to vote. The film is about the American dream and Obama’s dream. In some ways it’s about my dream, which is the immigrants’ dream. Also, worked in there is Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream and the dream of the founders. In that sense it’s very different. In some ways I was inspired to do this by Michael Moore. I feel embarrassed to say that because Michael Moore’s “Fahrenheit 9/11” is an intellectual disaster, but nevertheless that film was about a controversial president and it was received at a time when one half of the country was for the president and one half was against him and it was dropped in the middle of an election. So that gave me the idea to make a film under similar conditions – controversial president, one half of the country is for him, one half is against him, and drop it in the middle of this year’s debate. But I wanted to make and have made a very different kind of a film that is not fast with the facts and is intellectually and factually very sound. So far, no one has alleged the contrary. (CP)
Thomas Sowell:Years, and sometimes decades, pass between my visits to movie theaters. But I drove 30 miles to see the movie “2016,” based on Dinesh D’Souza’s best-selling book, “The Roots of Obama’s Rage.” Where I live is so politically correct that such a movie would not even be mentioned, much less shown.

Every seat in the theater was filled, even though there had been an earlier showing that day, and more showings were scheduled for the rest of the afternoon and evening. I had to sit on a staircase in the balcony, but it was worth it.

The audience was riveted. You could barely hear a sound from them, or detect a movement, and certainly not smell popcorn. Yet the movie had no bombast, no violence, no sex and no spectacular visual effects.

The documentary itself was fascinating, as Dinesh D’Souza presented the story of Barack Obama’s life and view of the world, in a very conversational sort of way, illustrating it with visits to people and places around the world that played a role in the way Obama’s ideas and beliefs evolved.

It was refreshing to see how addressing adults as adults could be effective, in an age when so many parts of the media address the public as if they were children who need a constant whirlwind of sounds and movements to keep them interested.

Dinesh D’Souza’s own perspective, as someone born in India who came to America and became an American, provided a special insight into the way people from the Third World often perceive or misperceive the United States and the Western world.

That Third World perspective is Obama’s perspective, D’Souza demonstrates in this documentary, as in his book — and it is a perspective that is very foreign to that of most Americans, which may be why some believe that Obama was born elsewhere.

D’Souza is convinced that the president was born in Hawaii, as he claims, but argues that not only Obama’s time living in Indonesia and his emotionally charged visits to his father’s home in Africa, have had a deep and impassioned effect on his thinking.

The story of Barack Obama, however, is not just the story of how one man came to be the way he is. It is a much larger story about how millions of Americans came to vote for, and some to idolize, a man whose fundamental beliefs and values are so different from their own.

For every person who sees Obama as somehow foreign there are many others who see him as a mainstream American political figure — and an inspiring one.

This D’Souza attributes to Barack Obama’s great talents in rhetoric, and his ability to project an image that resonates with most Americans, however much that image may differ from, or even flatly contradict, the reality of Obama’s own ideological view of the world.

What is that ideological view?

The Third World, or anti-colonial, view is that the rich nations have gotten rich by taking wealth from the poor nations. It is part of a much larger vision, in which the rich in general have gotten rich by taking from the poor, whether in their own country or elsewhere.

Whatever its factual weaknesses, it is an emotionally powerful vision, to which many people have dedicated their lives, and for which some have even risked their lives. Some of these people appear in this documentary movie, as they have appeared throughout the formative phases of Barack Obama’s life.

The Reverend Jeremiah Wright is just the most visible and vocal of a long line of such people who played crucial roles in Obama’s evolution. When Jeremiah Wright thundered about how “white folks’ greed runs a world in need,” he captured the essence of the Third World or anti-colonial vision.

But many of the other mentors, allies, family and friends of Barack Obama over the years were of the same mindset, as this documentary demonstrates.

More important, the movie “2016” demonstrates how so many of Obama’s actions as President of the United States, which D’Souza had predicted on the basis of his study of Obama’s background, are perfectly consistent with that ideology, however inconsistent it is with the rhetoric that gained him the highest office in the land.

http://www.amazon.com/Want-Your-Money-Ken-Blackwell/dp/B004Q4PEBQ

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